Case Studies

Case Studies

Two examples of CSO communities that utilized Water Bank funding successfully to implement green infrastructure projects are Camden's Phoenix Park and Hoboken's Southwest Park.

PHOENIX PARK, CAMDEN
The Phoenix Park project remediated the former American Minerals site in Camden, N.J., and converted the brownfield site into a recreational area with a gravel walking path, overlook, parking area, and wetlands marshy area with plantings of approximately 30 native evergreen trees, native meadows, and turf grass. The Camden County Municipal Utilities Authority (CCMUA) received an $8 million loan from the Water Bank, in addition to other funding sources, to develop this project. The newly remediated park provides multiple benefits, including access to the Delaware River for residents and a reduction in flooding, as the park's green spaces capture millions of gallons of stormwater annually. CCMUA collaborated with a number of partners on this green infrastructure project, including the City of Camden, Cooper's Ferry Partnership, Rutgers Cooperative Extension Water Resources Program, New Jersey Tree Foundation, the state Department of Environmental Protection and the Nature Conservancy.
SOUTHWEST PARK, HOBOKEN
The City of Hoboken received a $5.1 million Water Bank loan to develop the Southwest Park project. Southwest Park is a one-acre parcel that has been designed to capture 200,000 gallons of stormwater runoff while providing access to green space for neighborhood residents. According to the I-Bank, Southwest Park serves as a small-scale model for integrating green infrastructure and underground retention to reduce flooding. The stormwater design combines passive rainwater collection, utilizing permeable pavement, rain gardens and bioswales, with subsurface storage beneath the park. All of the pavement within the park is permeable, so that the first rainfall is absorbed within the pavement. Subterranean storage chambers located in the zone between the park pavement and the water table collect overflow from the rain garden and any drain inlets within the park. The stored rainwater is then slowly released once the severe weather event has subsided to reduce the peak flow to the city's sewer system and keep the combined sewer system from overflowing. This project qualified for $1 million in principal forgiveness and is projected to save Hoboken an additional $1.02 million in interest over the 20-year term of the loan for a total savings to the City of just over $2 million - similar to a 40% grant!
Case Studies
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